Classics

Valerie Solanas (1936-1988)  is the author of the major book of radical feminism and modern gynarchy, the “SCUM Manifesto”. She wrote a play that worked and considered very much, “Up Your Ass”.
His militant and eventful life was the subject of several biographies, novels and a movie, I Shot Andy Warhol. She died of pneumonia in misery and a near forgetfulness.
She became the friend of Wilda Holts who shared with her the psychological after-effects of rape and her hatred of the males. At the same time, under the pseudonym Wilda Chase, she wrote a short story, The Twig Benders, which prefigures a gynarchic future making the heterosexual counterpart of the SCUM Manifesto. She killed herself a few years later.

The SCUM Manifesto, the most violent of the 60s and 70s’ feminist texts was written in 1967. For the fiftieth anniversary of this prophetic text advocating the most radical feminism, since it purely and simply considers the suppression of the male sex, we offers this edition, with introduction and notes of Aline d’Arbrant. At the same time, Valerie Solanas was a friend of this other radical feminist, Wilda Chase, and we added to this edition the short novel that this ither gynarchist wrote the same year The Twig Benders. The future gynarchist and cruel she described is an heterosexual response to the disappearance of males suggested the SCUM Manifesto and thus finds its perfect place here.

Valerie Solanas
SCUM Manifesto
&
Wilda Chase
The Twig Benders

Introduction and notes by Aline d’Arbrant

The SCUM Manifesto, the most violent of the 60s and 70s’ feminist texts was written in 1967. For the fiftieth anniversary of this prophetic text advocating the most radical feminism, since it purely and simply considers the suppression of the male sex, we offers this edition, with introduction and notes of Aline d’Arbrant. At the same time, Valerie Solanas was a friend of this other radical feminist, Wilda Chase, and we added to this edition the short novel that this other gynarchist wrote the same year The Twig Benders. The future gynarchist and cruel she described is an heterosexual response to the disappearance of males suggested the SCUM Manifesto and thus finds its perfect place here.

 



 

Boris_Vian_-_WIKI
Boris Vian (1920-1959) was a French polymath: writer, poet, musician, singer, translator, critic, actor, inventor and engineer. He is best remembered today for his novels. Those published under the pseudonym Vernon Sullivan were bizarre parodies of criminal fiction, highly controversial at the time of their release. Vian’s other fiction, published under his real name, featured a highly individual writing style with numerous made-up words, subtle wordplay and surrealistic plots.

The Three Fairies of Vallyeuse

Jean, for his vacation, chose skiing and snow. In an almost deserted hotel, he is fascinated by three beautiful young women who, early on, despise him. Despite their open contempt, he admiratively look at them. It is not yet clear that they will be the instruments of his destiny… From a story by Boris Vian, Gynarchy International created this book of cartoons in 3D. The three female characters who combine lesbianism and sadism with the same happiness at the expense of too curious male, will remain in all memories.

 


leopoldcover Leopold von Sacher-Masoch (1836–1895) was an Austrian writer and journalist, who gained renown for his novel Venus in Furs. The term masochism is derived from his name. Aline d’Arbrant (1952-2015) improved his masterpiece with her Saphine’s Letters to Wanda that presents Wanda as a modernand gynarchist lesbian.

 

 

    Severin wants to become the slave of a woman wearing furs. Wanda accepts toplay this role, first seeming shocked and hesitant. But which of the two protagonists really is the toy of the other: Severin, the manipulated manipulator, or Wanda, the sexually free woman?
    This new edition of

Venus in Furs

    of Sacher-Masoch differs from the previous by 3Dcolor illustrations and by the new vision that the famous writer Aline d’Arbrant gives us of the novel and of the heroin. First by her illuminating introduction, then by the new epistolary novel that follows the text,

Saphine’s Letters to Wanda

    , that allows us to see Wanda as a modern lesbian discovering gynarchy through the masochism of Severin.